Day +159: Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains is not an easy place to find delicious, cheap food. The Hatter’s Café was expensive, but at least the food was edible.

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High tea at Lilianfels was as nice as it looked. The scones were perfect, and the sandwiches very tasty. We couldn’t eat it all so we got a doggy bag….

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We haven’t been to the Three Sisters for years. And not much has really changed.

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It’s still pretty, but the costs of the rides have increased significantly. To my surprise, they still have free parking at Echo Point (not so at the Three Sisters). We finished the day with dinner at the lounge in Lilianfels; the food was way better than anything we saw in Katoomba itself.

 

FOCUS ON:

People love photographing food- especially beautifully presented food in an expensive restaurant. But this can be difficult because:

  1. It’s often dark (the more expensive the restaurant, the more likely that the “mood lighting” is not great for photography)
  2. As a result, it’s difficult to get adequate depth-of-field (having all the food in focus). Out of focus food looks terrible
  3. You may not be able to move around much, and it maybe hard to fit the whole plate in the frame, depending on the lens you’re using

Flash is usually not possible, and even if so, tends to be too harsh for food photography. Fast lenses can help in terms of letting in more light, but using wide apertures results in very shallow depth-of-field (see above). Bumping up the ISO can allow you to use smaller apertures, whilst keeping the shutter speed high enough that you don’t get shaky / blurry images. Ideally, you need to add artificial light (eg. using a strobe, video light), but this usually is not possible. If you can, pick a table near a window and use the natural light from outside- good luck!